Posts Tagged ‘ drafting ’

Moda Hotel Mural Install Remi Rough, Joker, Sueme, and Augustine Kofie

Photo Aaron R T Smedley

Photo Aaron R T Smedley

Photo Aaron R T Smedley

Photo Aaron R T Smedley

Photo Aaron R T Smedley

Photo Aaron R T Smedley

Photo Aaron R T Smedley

Photo Aaron R T Smedley

Photo Aaron R T Smedley

Photo Aaron R T Smedley

Photo Aaron R T Smedley

Photo Aaron R T Smedley

Photo Aaron R T Smedley

Photo Remi Rough

Photo Remi Rough



As we posted previously Remi Rough , Augustine Kofie, Scott Sueme, and Joker would be installing a mural. They finished there Mural Install at the Moda Hotel in Vancouver as part of their Unintended Calculations Show at Becker Galleries. Monumental in Size the 4 man team was able to tackle the walls in a 3 day period leading up to the opening. Indigo the curator of the install and event couldn’t have picked anyone else that would have complimented each others work so well. Thank to Aaron Smedley for the beautiful photographs as he was able to document the install. Also thanks again to GetGrounded TV for the video shot day one of the install. We hope to have some of the pictures from the opening of the show in the next couple days.

GF

Unintended Calculations Sneak Preview Augustine Kofie Jerry Inscoe Scott Sueme Remi Rough Curated by Indigo

Kofie Upstairs Collage Art Photo by Todd Mazer

Kofie Upstairs Collage Art Photo by Todd Mazer

Sueme Detail

Sueme Detail

Sueme in Progress

Joker Detail

Joker Detail

Joker Detail

Evaristus detail Remi

Lucrezia Detail Remi

Marozia Detail Remi

Celestine work in progress Remi

Unintended Calculations is an upcoming exhibition at Becker Galleries that is very special to Graffuturism and its extended family of contributors and artists. You can say these artists involved in this exhibition are one of the reasons this site exists. It is with great satisfaction that we are able to post these preview images of some of the work that will be in the show. Thanks to Indigo for the pictures, and also for bringing these artists together and allowing them to build upon an already in motion evolution of our art form. Thanks to Grounded TV who shot the video. I am not ruling out making the trip to see this show in person, and if I were anywhere near Vancouver I would suggest making the trip to this event.

GF

Here is a brief Bio about the Show

“Curated by Indigo, Unintended Calculations brings together a group of internationally renowned artists – Augustine Kofie (LA), Jerry Inscoe (PDX), Remi/Rough (LDN) and Scott Sueme (VAN) – for an exhibition at Becker Galleries and two collaborative murals at Moda Hotel exploring four very different approaches to abstraction. Working in a variety of mediums, these artists have evolved the letter form building blocks of their shared graffiti background, deconstructing and rebuilding them as compositions of color, line, shape and movement.”

“Linear Empires” Group Show at White Walls Gallery

Moneyless Installation Golden Gate Park

Moneyless

Greg Ito

Kofie One

Richard Pearse

Mary Iverson

Diana Ruiz and Geoff Campen

Moneyless Installation

Moneyless

Kofie One

Mary Iverson

Greg Ito

Diana Ruiz and Geoff Campen

Diana Ruiz and Geoff Campen

Diana Ruiz and Geoff Campen

Mary Iverson

Kofie One

Moneyless

Greg Ito

Diana Ruiz and Geoff Campen

Diana Ruiz and Geoff Campen

Moneyless

Mary Iverson

I was able to catch up with Moneyless at White Walls Gallery in his first ever exhibition in America. Augustine Kofie was also featured in the show, as well as some other great artists. Many of the artists work I was seeing for the first time. The show titled “Linear Empires” focused on where art and design intersect. Moneyless had a strong showing of paintings that utilized his strength of linear compositions. His floating graffiti geometry installed floating above his work created a sense of lightness to the whole installation. Moneyless has plans after the show to do some installations around the bay area before he heads home to Italy. He has already done one install at San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park. Kofie’s work as usual was worth the trip to see, as he continues to push deeper into his collage work with these pieces involving some great images that don’t overpower his precise and powerful line work. I really was impressed with all the artists in the show, Geoff Campen and his wife Diana Ruiz teamed up for some great collage mix media work that was very well done. Geoff is a great guy as well, really looking forward to seeing their future work. Greg Ito, Mary Iverson and Richard Pearse all had amazing paintings. As a whole a great show, and i am very glad White Walls Gallery was able to bring Moneyless to town, showing him with Kofie was a bonus. Here are some excerpts from interviews they did with the artists, you can read the full article following this link to the White Walls Gallery Blog.

Augustine Kofie

Why do you choose to depict such precise graphic elements using a wide variety of mediums within each piece? Do you feel that it’s essential to the aesthetic or the technique in any particular way?

“Because it aesthetically appeals to me. I am developing a style that envelopes all of my inspirations and loves. I am very heavy with technique and application when it comes to work on woods, a solid natural surface. Applying layers of found paper to a surface, then building a structured painting on to top helps me with my overall end result, which is the exploration of controlled layers, balance of line, space and form.”

Tell us about you interest in old-school drafting and related processes. How are you attempting to bring a fresh perspective to these processes as a fine artist/street artist?

“For some time I have found inspiration from late 50′s to late 70′s graphic design as well as music. Majority of these adverts were hand built ‘cut and pasted’ then drafted together using now outdated applications. I passionately collect various ephemera based around engineering, drafting and ‘DIY’ booklets and incorporate them out of sheer inspiration and admiration. I consider my assemblage artworks to be a sort of evolution of this same ‘cut and paste’ technique, just updated with my linear painting style. The hybrid of old and new interweaving intrigues me, the beautiful Vintage Futurism contradiction at work.”

Moneyless

Why do you choose to work with such pure and precise geometric forms and color blocking above any other visual devices? How did your relationship with these types of forms begin?

“I guess it’s a consequence of my graffiti period. Considering my entire artistic path, I’ve found the seeds of my actual works in the period I was experimenting the graffiti’s world. Back in 2004 I started writing “Moneyless” in a more geometric way, and while the lettering was still the protagonist, I started feeling the needing of gradually move away from it. The “type face” thus became a constriction, but mainly the writing rules were constraints for me, I found them quite outdated. The blossoming period of writing had ended already and what was left turned out in some boring verbal fights with rare authenticity.

I thought I could be able to use the wall – our medium par excellence – in a quite different way. My bond with lettering was slackening little by little. As far as I was concerned, I only cared about its shape, but being able to see it alone forced me to cut any reference to the sign itself. The world of simple and pure geometric thus became the ground of my endless investigation on shapes, which extends to the present time. Minimalism and geometry are the fundamental elements of my constructions, which heavily try to face the system of communication that traps us with information chaos. Given this, only simplicity and subtraction can give another point of view.”

When you’re working on pieces of gallery art, how is it similar or different to the work you do out in the street? What are some of the challenges you face when doing this kind of work outside of the studio? What are some of the benefits?


“What I do inside the galleries is normally the result of what I produce outside, it’s bringing my outer experience closer to somebody. I need a sort of intimate scene when I’m creating on the outside: I look for calm, nature, woods, abandoned spots… at the same time, galleries permit me to show my work to a public, as well as giving me a chance to come out of that kind of isolation that investigation on art may require.”


White Walls Gallery

Augustine Kofie Mural Miami Art Basel Primary Flight 2010

Kofie Detail


Kofie Detail


Kofie Detail


Kofie Detail


Kofie Detail


Kofie Detail


Kofie Detail


Kofie Detail


Kofie Mural Art Basel 2010



Kofie Freehand Circle

I ran into Kofie in Miami where he was busy all week completely killing this wall. Here are some of the shots i took of the completed wall. All business with Mr Augustine Kofie as he continues to create amazing works of art across the country and world. I have a feeling that 2011 is going to be another big year for Kofie. Much respect as he deserves all the acclaim that is coming his way.


http://keepdrafting.com/

Augustine Kofie Solo Show at White Walls Gallery Retrofitted and other forms of Vintage Futurism










Here are some Great pictures of Augustine Kofie’s Recent Solo Show at White Walls Gallery in San Francisco. These shots were taken by photographer Scott la Rock who always seems to capture the work perfectly. The show titled Retrofitted & other forms of Vintage Futurism was an amazing show and if you were lucky to attend you know how great the whole body of work was. The time lapse video Kofie shot is the closest you can get to seeing the whole process, but the amount of detail in the work and the countless time I’m sure it took Kofie to collect his mix media material cannot be seen. Kofie’s installation and move into some more sculptural pieces and mix media are what really got me excited about the show. We all know Kofies ability to paint and he did not disappoint in that manner at all, but it was the triangular pieces that he assembled with collage and collected vintage material that i really enjoyed. All around a great Solo showing as Kofie did not disappoint and continues to push forward yet with a solid foot in the past as his work is a great reflection of the balance of both.

White Walls Gallery Site with Show Pricing for Artwork
Kofie One Website
Photographer Scott La Rock’s Flickr

Joker Transcend BA Video MTN Colors

Joker Detail Photo courtesy of Scott La Rock


Kofie & Remi Rough Photo courtesy of Scott La Rock


Joker Painting Photo courtesy of Scott La Rock


Codak Detail Photo courtesy of Scott La Rock


Poesia Painting Photo courtesy of Scott La Rock


Diel Charachter Detail Photo courtesy of Scott La Rock


Kema Detail Photo courtesy of Scott La Rock


Joker Remi Poesia Detail Photo courtesy of Scott La Rock


Kofie Detail Photo courtesy of Scott La Rock


Rough Detail Photo courtesy of Scott La Rock


Whole Wall Finished

Here is the Video of the wall Joker painted earlier this year, this video was recently released by MTN Colors. I posted the wall while back from a meeting of writers that included myself, Kofie, Joker, Rough, Kema,Codak and Diel. Kofie and Remi were showing some work at White Walls Gallery in SF, Joker Flew in to see the Show. This was the perfect opportunity to get a bunch of like minded artists together on a wall. Thanks to Mr toads in SF we secured a nice spot. After painting this wall the idea of Graffuturism was born and basically pushed me to get out there and show artists with similar mindsets.

The guys at MTN Colors in SF came through and filmed Joker painting for there series of videos they are putting out. Here is the Video they just released of that Day.

Also Photographer Scott La Rock stopped by and was able to shoot some photo’s as well. All Pictures Copyright of Scott La Rock.

More Links

MTN Colors Vimeo Page

Scott La Rock’s Flickr Page

PREYS UPS Interviewed By Joker














Preys UPS probably one of the most unique and original Graff artists painting right now in my opinion. Coming from the states he has become one of my favorite writers who’s work I always look forward to seeing. There is an air of uncomfortability in his work that draws me too it, just when you think you have seen everything and every style. Then you see an artist like Preys and it reminds you that there is something left to find out there, and just maybe everything hasn’t been done already. I have been trying to get more Artist’s on the site from the states and Preys was gracious enough to take the time and answer some questions for us. When I mentioned it to some of the guys behind the scenes I was going to interview Preys and if they had any questions for him, Joker stepped up and actually put together some great questions for him. So here is the interview make sure to check out his flickr also. Like I said before if you haven’t had the privilege of seeing Preys recent walls you have been missing out.

Joker: How do you approach your construction? Meaning… when you put paint to wall, what is the plan? Do you go in knowing where it’s going to go (colors chosen, layout planned, aesthetics…) and how it’s going to finish or do you show up and stare blankly at the wall waiting for “it” to hit you?

Preys: I laughed out loud when I read your question, because it sums up exactly what I think my biggest problem is when it comes to painting. So I would say that 90% of the time I have a pretty good idea in my head of what I am gonna paint. I have a few outlines, and doodles stuffed in my bag as well as some reference material (print outs, photos, whatever I think might work their way into the piece). I also email a lot of these visual ideas to myself, so I can peep at them on the phone when I am feeling lost. So there is almost always a lose plan. Colors, I usually think about them while I am gathering / drawing stuff. Sometimes I write down what colors go where etc, then I either get the colors I need for that or pull my supplies. That being said, the colors situation never really goes that smoothly. Unfortunately I am super attracted to certain colors or color combinations and they always find their way into whatever I am painting, so that is always something to struggle with. The other problem is that I am never that dedicated to (have confidence in) my original scheme so that often changes along the way. I very often reduce the amount of colors I use just because I am struggling with something else, mainly the outline. Or because they looked better on the can than they do on the wall. Then there is the “it” factor. More times than I would like to admit, my original plan has a meltdown, things are not going right, proportions are off, color combinations are shit, caps are clogging, etc. That is when the “it” factor either decides to show up or not. When it does, it’s a fucking party. I know what goes where, it is all worked out in my head and all I have to do is follow the directions that are laying themselves down. When ” it” doesn’t show up, it’s a fucking struggle to get through it. More often than not, “it” shows up in little ways so a few details are cool, but when “it” shows up for the overall, it’s a good day.

Joker: Your actual letters are fairly simple in their design, something I admire and strive for all the time myself, but it’s how you build the letters together and play with the lines that really abstracts them. This idea is really evident in the last year. Is this natural progression?

Preys: Yeah I think that after the first few straight up simple pieces, I just started overlapping letters and playing with negative shapes to try to get some more complex combinations from the original simple letter forms. My natural tendency is to fill up the space, make more lines, etc. So I try to remember to keep the letters simple. So it can be deceptively complex based on simple parts.

Joker: Outside of writing, what do you find inspirational that you find gives you ideas for your paintings?

Preys: Films, videos, animation, and really anything. Unfortunately right now I feel like I’m in a little bit of a creative rut. So I’m looking for some real inspiration. One of the little tricks I used to do (and I am not condoning this to anyone else but me) is sometimes smoke a little weed, just enough to dilate my pupils slightly and just enough to let my mind wander. Then I go look at images that I have either saved on my computer or favorites on a site, watch tv, listen to music whatever etc. The combination of slightly blurred vision and my mind making random connections is often a good place to look for inspiration, new ideas and concepts. At least for me it is. I need to do this tonight.

Joker: Do you consider yourself an abstract writer or just a writer?

Preys: I would consider myself just a writer. My opinion on graffiti is kind of simple. You use spray paint or not, you write a name, you’re a writer. How you want to write it is up to you.

Joker: I see your work as having an almost ‘outsider’ graphic design aesthetic. you absolutely have the sensibility, but it’s so radically unique that I’m not sure if ‘typography’ from the straight laced side of the tracks is even part of your intent. any insight as to graphic design being a motivation to your work?

Preys: I fear I will get shit for this, but the honest answer is this. I’m a designer in the 9-5 world. However it wasn’t what I went to school for, so one of the biggest holes in my design knowledge / education is the proper lessons on typography that one gets from being a graphic design major. I used to think that graffiti was the my ticket to teaching myself the rules of typography. However the rules of type in the print and web world are way different than in the graffiti world. Graffiti is more over all design than straight up typography. In the graffiti world we don’t spend a lot of time on multiple words and their relationship to each other. Just multiple letters and their relationship to each other. All that shit being said, the graffiti I like and strive to do does interesting things with letters.
What I try to do is turn letters into feelings / moods. Try to create a world that the letters live in. Recently it has been a kind of laser future 80’s world. And just writing this makes me want to go way deeper into that world.


Joker: What is your position on technique and special effects as contributors to a person’s style?

Preys: I had a big debate with my friends Jimboe and Kems about this just the other day. We were talking about the differences between design, style, and technique in the world of graffiti. A few years ago I found this poem by Charles Bukowski called Style. Not to sound too much like a douche bag, but this one section pretty much summed up what I think style is all about.
“Style is the answer to everything.
A fresh way to approach a dull or dangerous thing
To do a dull thing with style is preferable to doing a dangerous thing without it
To do a dangerous thing with style is what I call art”
-Charles Bukowski

There are writers that have amazing technique and know all the tricks and special effects, but they lack style. They lack that special hand that makes it look like some other creature from another planet created it. Style seems to be a really hard thing to obtain, especially for myself. I know that some people think my shit lacks style because it seems semi technical, I kind of agree. But really I know I’m on to something good when I feel slightly uncomfortable about what I am painting. That’s the dangerous part of trying to make something new and interesting with style. When a line seems awkward, or a shape wrong, sometimes those are the most successful parts of a piece for me. I have a theory on art / design which is that really groundbreaking stuff should confuse you at first. If you feel comfortable right away with a new piece that means you didn’t push it far enough. It means the visual vocabulary you used is comfortable to the viewer, which means it contains just enough things they have seen before so they can understand it. Real break through shit should make you slightly confused between whether that thing is the newest best thing you have ever seen, or the worst thing you have ever seen. If you have nothing to compare that piece to, then it is something new, something innovative. I am not saying I do this, but I would like to think it is my goal.

Remi Rough: Are you in any way religious? Being that you chose tthe name Preys, or does it have hunting connotations?

Preys: Not religious at all. However I did go to Catholic elementary school and always got into the weird power religious icons had. I thought Preys was a witty play on the word PRAY / PRAISE / PREY. When I started writing for real I wrote Juan, a nickname some kids in school gave me cause they thought I was Spanish. Then I got caught up in some personal and legal shit and ended up trying to make a new start. After desperately trying to come up with a cool name I settled on Preys. All I can say is that it sounded cool at the time. The weird thing about what you write is even though the word’s meaning might be lost to the person writing it, the audience often reads into it – along with how you write it. I don’t think about the meaning of the word as much as I should. In fact, I need to step my shit up and one of the ways I need to do that is by using the literal meanings of my tag more in the concepts for my pieces.

GF: Any final Thoughts or shout outs?

Preys: I just wanted to thank you for contacting me about sharing my work, I sincerely appreciate it and it reminds me that maybe all this painting shit is not in vain.

Catch more of Preys Work at the Links below

His Flickr Page